This Week’s Show 14th June 2018

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SHOW NOTES

I begin this week with the Wilderness Gathering, then the Blizzard Survival 20% Discount offer, Portable Alarm System With Motion Sensor Review, Fluoride Is Poison, Survival Cooking Risks, BREAK How to Build a Survival Shelter, Survival Skills in Your Head, Crossing Rivers, The Deadly Enemies to Your Survival, UK Self Defence Items.

The Wilderness Gathering

If you’ve never been to the Gathering before and you love nature and the outdoors, then this is the family show for you – Wilderness Gathering, a unique Bushcraft event, is the longest running and still the original festival of bushcraft, survival and primitive living skills.

The Gathering has become a social event and brings together families and friends, all those interested in Bushcraft and Wilderness living skills to enjoy a weekend of knowledge sharing in a relaxed and family friendly atmosphere

Live Music

Not only is the Gathering the place you to come to – to learn new skills, brush up on your old ones and meet some of the best bushcraft experts in the country but it has also become, over the past fifteen years, the place you come to – to gather and socialise round the campfire with friends, old and new.

Children’s Bushcraft

The Coyote Clubs were introduced in 2005 and host a comprehensive range of events and activities specifically tailored for children from 5 to 15 year old.

The Masterclass

The Masterclasses were introduced in 2005 and are your opportunity to study your favourite Bushcraft subject in depth with a leading Bushcraft instructors.

Where is it?

Located on a South Wiltshire farm with lakes and 30 acres of old oak woodlands. You get access to woodlands and fields to erect whatever shelter you want.

Add to this great food, local cider, mead, evening entertainment. great people and it’s now over 5 days it has to time to get booked http://www.wildernessgathering.co.uk/tickets.htm.

Blizzard Survival 20% Discount Offer

Blizzard Survival .com have a fantastic offer for you the listener they are offering a 20% discount on all goods bought from them at www.blizzardsurvival.com

The Ultimate in Lightweight Thermal Protection.

The Blizzard Survival Brand incorporating Reflexcell™ material has become the new standard wherever thermal performance in a lightweight compact package is essential – for military use, casualty care, emergency preparedness, disaster relief, personal survival, outdoor activities…and more.

Reflexcell™ products are totally unique: weight-for-weight far warmer than goose down, yet 100% weatherproof, tough, ultra-portable and re-usable.

Life-saving technology has never been so affordable.

All you have to do to get a 20% discount is enter the code “PREPPER” at the checkout, it is that simple. Thank you Blizzard Survival.com

Portable Alarm System With Motion Sensor Review

Portable Motion Alarm System With Expandable Terminal
This compact motion sensor will detect anyone who attempts to enter the protected area. If motion is detected a powerful 90 db alarm siren will sound off to scare the intruder away and alert others to pay attention to the motion detected event. 

This alarm in portable size is suitable for home, office, patio, hotel room, retail store or travel use. It can be fixated on the wall horizontally or vertically or simply put it on the desk or hand carry it.

This motion alarm unit is 9V-battery operated and no wiring needed. It can be easily installed or moved to a new location. Also featured with a low battery LED indicator and an adjustable mounting bracket.  With this motion alarm, your family will be instantly alerted to potential dangers. Intruder will know that they have been detected.

In addition to the security purpose, this motion alarm can also be used in retail store, show room or reception area for notifying the personnel for greeting visitors in the needed area. Or users may set it up at camp site as the watchdog for all purposes.

Portable Personal Alarm
The typical alarm system was big, bulky motion detectors. All that has been changed with this motion alarm in compact size. It is great to be used at home for nursing care such as alerting parents if young children wander off into an area that might be hazardous such as a hot BBQ table, pool area or other potentially dangerous location.

Users may also aim this motion alarm to driveway, front/back door, windows and patio doors for extra home security. All other suitable applications including:

  • Home alarm

  • Restricted area

  • Monitoring surrounding areas

  • Travel protection

  • Visitors greeting

  • Camping

Alarm/Chime Mode
This motion alarm unit has a mode switch for selecting between different operation mode as needed:

  • Alarm Mode: When intruder is detected and alarm is trigger with 30 seconds siren sound. After setting this unit at alarm mode, there will be 15 seconds allowed for users to leave the detection area. And the similar entry delay will allow users to switch off the alarm after getting into the detection area.

  • Chime Mode: ding-dong sound will be activated by any motion detected.

  • Off Mode: When at “OFF” mode, this this motion alarm is dis-armed and not active.

Expandable Security System
This motion sensor alarm system is expandable with two external hard-wired magnetic or IR detectors to become a small area security alarm system.

Wide Detection Range
This mini motion detector alarm uses PIR passive infrared technology to protect a room from intruders. It creates an unseen barrier that’s impossible to be penetrated within 30 feet away. 

This motion alarm produces an infrared coverage range of 100 degree angle with 30ft max distance. Any motion event can be detected reliably within the effective range.

I really do like this alarm, I have used it when camping and had it set off by wild animals of some sort moving around at night.

I have set it up covering a track and had ample warning of a group of lads walking towards my camp area, who when the alarm went off turned around and went the other way.

I even had wood pigeons setting it off as they landed in by back garden.

It’s a great small and cheap addition to your kit that will give you that extra level of security when camping in the great outdoors.

You can get your at http://www.allaboutadapters.com/poalsywimose.htm

Fluoride Is Poison

Fluoride Officially Classified as a Neurotoxin in World’s Top Medical Journal

Fluoride Officially Classified as a Neurotoxin in World’s Most Prestigious Medical Journal :

The movement to remove industrial sodium fluoride from the world’s water supply has been growing in recent years, with evidence coming out against the additive from several sources.

Now, a report from the world’s oldest and most prestigious medical journal, The Lancet, has officially classified fluoride as a neurotoxin — in the same category as arsenic, lead and mercury.

The news was broken by author Stefan Smyle, who cited a report published in The Lancet Neurology, Volume 13, Issue 3, in the March 2014 edition, by authors Dr. Phillippe Grandjean and Philip J. Landrigan, MD.

To all my listeners especially those who have small children and those
that suffer with
Fibromyalgia

I wouldn’t have researched this subject if I wasn’t concerned with your health
and safety, and the health and safety of your loved ones.

I know we all get crazy emails trying to scare us about everything imaginable, and I am always the last one to believe them and the first one to disprove them as urban legend.

But unfortunately this reality is one that has irrefutable science behind it and a shocking truth that I have been compelled to share with everyone I know. The truth revealed here maybe the biggest scientific cover up of our modern era.Please share this with your friends and family, and spread the word…

What is Fluoride

Let me ask you a few rational questions;Would you brush your teeth with rat poison if it just might have some kind of beneficial properties as an anti-cavity agent? Yes, I am asking you if you would put a highly toxic poison that was used as rat killer and as insecticide in your mouth and brush your teeth with it.

Would make your children brush their teeth with a toxin slightly less poisonous than arsenic and even more poisonous than lead, even though everyday they ingested some of this toxic substance that would accumulate throughout their body and could cause numerous health problems?

What if there was so much poison in their toothpaste that it would kill them if they ate the whole tube because it tasted like bubble gum; would you leave it in their bathroom drawer or would you keep it locked up with the medicines or toxic cleaning agents?If you have been using fluoride toothpaste to brush your teeth, you should have
answered “yes” to all of the above questions.

Before we go any further, let’s look at the definition of Sodium Fluoride and establish the fact that it is a highly poisonous substance.

Here is the definition of Sodium Fluoride that is used in toothpaste to prevent
cavities:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/sodium+fluoride

sodium fluoride
– noun
a colourless, crystalline, water-soluble, poisonous solid, NaF, used chiefly in the fluoridation of water, as an insecticide, and as a rodenticide.

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2010.

Hmmm, there’s just something insane about using the words “poisonous solid”, “rodenticide”, “insecticide”, and the “fluoridation of water” in the same definition. Fluorine compounds, or fluorides, are listed by the US Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) as being in the top 20 of 275 toxic substances which pose the most significant threat to human health.

We have all been brushing our teeth with rat poison and one of the most environmentally damaging toxic waste substances produced by the aluminium and
fertilizer industries in America, Sodium Fluoride.

We’ve also been drinking Fluorosilicic Acid (an inexpensive liquid by-product of phosphate fertilizer manufacturering process) in our tap water and cooking with it as well.

Go read the warning on the back of your toothpaste tube.


“WARNING: Keep out of reach of children under 6 years of age. If you
accidentally swallow more than used for brushing, seek professional help or
contact a doctor .”

Your toothpaste warning says that if you ingest more than the usual amount while brushing, call a doctor.

That’s because fluoride is a highly toxic poison and each tube of toothpaste, even the bubble gum flavoured specifically marketed for children, contains enough fluoride to kill a child.
http://www.fluoridealert.org/toothpaste.html

When I was a child there wasn’t a poison warning label on my toothpaste tube
letting me know not to swallow it because it was poison. Back then toothpaste
commercials showed a tooth brush just loaded with toothpaste.

Back then no one was telling anyone, “Don’t swallow your toothpaste”. Fluoride was portrayed as perfectly safe to your health in commercials and by government publications.

It wasn’t until April 7th, 1997, that the United States FDA (Food & Drug Administration) required that all fluoride toothpastes sold in the U.S. carry a poison warning on the label.

In this country we consume highly fluoridated tap water, processed foods and
drinks every day.

We consume more than the usual amount we would ingest by
brushing our teeth alone. One of the fastest ways to absorb a medicine is
directly under your tongue and we hold this poison in our mouths 2-3 times a
day when we brush our teeth.

Think about how often your children are swallowing it while brushing their
teeth because it tastes like bubble gum. We’ve been ingesting it for years and
it has been building up in our bodies because fluoride is an accumulative
toxin.

This toxin is taking its toll on the health and smiles of people of all ages in
the U.S., Britain, Canada, and other modernized countries. Dental Fluorosis is
a mild form of fluoride poisoning that is the most visible and well-recognized
side-effects of ingesting fluoride toothpaste and drinking too much fluoridated
water.

Dental Fluorosis is a discoloration of teeth that ranges from mild to severe. Whereas dental fluorosis used to impact less than 10% of children in the 1940s, the latest national survey found that it now affects over 30% of children.

Fluoridation could turn out to be one of the top 10 mistakes of the 21st century.

Survival Cooking Risks

So when the brown stuff hits the fan your will bug-out. You will build a shelter, light a fire,hunt, trap and fish and then sit around the fire singing “gin gang gooley” as
your food cooks.

It just sounds idyllic doesn’t it?

But according to recent figures this could be the most dangerous aspect of survival camping.

A shocking 94 per cent of more than 2,000 people questioned for a Government survey admit to at least one barbecue habit that is a health risk.

Food poisoning is a real risk at barbecues

FSA Chief executive Catherine Brown

Twenty-one per cent believe they have been ill due to something they have eaten as a result, the poll for the Food Standards Agency found.

Almost a third admit to not checking burgers, sausages and even chicken are cooked all the way through.

The FSA has released a list of tips to cut food poisoning, with the first being to pre-cook meat in the oven and finish it off on the barbecue for flavour.

Chief executive Catherine Brown said: “Food poisoning is a real risk at barbecues and we are reminding people to take good care of their families.”

Survival cooking is bar-b-q cooking is it not? When the shtf there will be no chemist, health centre, doctor or NHS to go to to sort out food poisoning, stomach upsets and
diarrhoea, all of which will dehydrate you and reduce your physical ability to
provide and survive.

OK I do not want to teach my grandmother to suck eggs by it never hurts to get back to basics.

Charred doesn’t mean cooked, cook your barbecue food thoroughly until you are sure that your poultry, pork, burgers, sausages and kebabs are steaming hot, with no pink meat inside.

Avoid cross-contamination by storing raw meat separately before cooking, use different utensils, plates and chopping boards for raw and cooked food. Always wash your hands thoroughly with soap and hot water and dry them before handling your food for the barbecue and after handling raw foods including meat, fish, eggs and vegetables.

(You should of course wash your hands after touching the bin, going to the
toilet, blowing your nose, or touching pets.)

Don’t wash raw chicken or other meat, it just splashes germs. Cooking will kill
any bacteria present, including campylobacter. On the other hand, washing
chicken, or other meat, can spread dangerous bugs on to your hands, clothes,
utensils and by splashing.

Turning meat regularly and moving it around the barbecue will help to cook it evenly.
Charred on the outside doesn’t always mean cooked on the inside so, it’s always
safer to cut open and check your burgers, sausages and chicken. If in doubt
–keep cooking.

Keep plates and cutlery away from raw meat and fish, never serve your guests cooked food on a plate or surface that’s had raw meat or fish on it, and don’t use cutlery or
marinades that have been in contact with raw meat. There’s no point in serving
up food with a flourish if you’re adding bugs back into the mix.

BREAK

How to Build a Survival Shelter

Sleeping outside in a primitive survival shelter with no tent and no sleeping bag?! In the rain? Are you crazy?

This idea may indeed seem crazy and a bit daunting to many of us. However, with a couple of hours, proper materials and the right mind set, constructing and sleeping in a primitive survival shelter can be a life-changing experience.

Although there are many types of group and individual primitive survival shelters, I often begin by teaching my students how to build a survival shelter called a debris hut. These structures are fairly easy to construct and can be a warm, dry place to spend the night.

First of all, location is key. Aside from the normal criteria which includes avoiding low spots, steering clear of standing dead trees, etc….proximity to materials can save a lot of time and energy. Take the time to find a spot that feels right.

For construction, the first thing you’ll need to build a survival shelter is a strong ridge pole that is at least a little taller than you are with your arm stretched above your head. You’ll also need something for one end of the ridgepole to securely rest on—a stump, boulder, fork of a tree, some kind of prop. The other end rests on the ground. At the high end, the ridgepole should be at about hip height.

Once your ridgepole is in place, you’ll need ribbing. Lean the ribs against the ridgepole fairly close together leaving a door at the high end. Once ribs are in place, crawl inside feet first checking to see that you have a little room to move, but that it is still snug and cosy.

If your survival shelter is too big, you will have trouble staying warm. Imagine you are making a sleeping bag out of natural materials!

Next, add a layer of lattice, something to act as a net to hold debris in place when it is piled on next. Brush and twiggy branches may work well with the debris that you have available this will also help determine how small the spaces in your lattice need to be.

The structure is now in place and it is time for the essential component of insulation. Of all the things you’ll learn about how to build a survival shelter, not having enough insulation on a cold night will teach you quickly what is required.

Get ready to shuffle your feet or make yourself a rake and start gathering debris! For good insulation, you’ll want material that can trap
air. Obviously, dry material is optimal. Pile on your leaves, ferns, grass, or
other available debris.

Keep piling, keep piling, go for TWO FEET THICK or more “all
over the shelter” if you might get rained on.

Be sure to close up the door area so that you have just enough room to squeeze in without disturbing the structure. Crawl in to see how your cocoon feels. Finish up your insulation by adding some small branches that will hold the debris in case of wind, maintaining as much loft as possible.

Now that the outer layer is complete, it is time to stuff your primitive survival shelter with dry soft debris. If you only have wet leaves, use them anyway, you may get wet, but you can still be warm.

Once your shelter is full of debris, wiggle in to compress a space for your body. Add more debris as needed, and don’t forget the foot area! Fill up the spaces if you are concerned about being cold.

Before you crawl in for the night in your primitive shelter, gather a pile of leaves near the door so that you can close yourself in most of the way.

Aside from having a great story to tell your grandkids one day — or from being able to teach others how to build a survival shelter, spending a night in a survival shelter like a debris hut is an opportunity to overcome fears and gain feelings of freedom and confidence.

Pushing our mental and physical comfort edges also brings us chances to find greater comfort and appreciation in our daily lives. HAPPY BUILDING AND SWEET DREAMS!

Survival Skills in Your Head

People sometimes forget that the smallest 20 Skills You Can Trade After SHTF and most convenient storage space is in their own heads.

If you find yourself in the midst of a disaster and you need to either build or fix something, having the knowledge and experience already in your mind will hugely benefit your ability to survive.

And if there’s something you need from your neighbours but you’re not willing to trade any of your supplies, you could do some work for them in exchange.

But what sort of skills will be the most useful after SHTF? vvvv

Knowing Microsoft Excel might not do you much good, but knowing how to make soap could mean the difference between health and sickness.

Or maybe you could trade your soap for more food. The point is, you need to learn a few skills that will be useful in a post-disaster world.

I suggest you take up one as a hobby while you still have time to learn.

Here, then, are 20 skills you can trade after the SHTF, listed in alphabetical order:

Animal Husbandry The ability to raise animals such as chicken for eggs, rabbits for meat, goats for milk, etc.

There is a limit to how much meat and dairy people will be able to store, and there will be a huge demand for fresh food.

Cleaning Not just washing your hands, but the ability to clean clothes without a washer and dryer, make cleaning products to use around the house, and keep your home germ free.

Clothing. If times are tough, people won’t be able to go out and charge new clothes and shoes any time they need them.

They’re going to need to fix shoes, patch torn pants, and mend shirts. This is an important skill that has become very rare in modern society.

Construction Especially without power tools. Is worth knowing, how to properly fix roofs, board up windows or build outhouses using only basic hand tools.

Cooking skills will be very much sought after as people are going to get sick and tired of eating canned soup and freeze-dried food.

If you can cook a tasty meal and dessert without power, people in the neighbourhood will thank you with favours or supplies they don’t need.

Most people live their entire lives without realizing how much misery they would experience if not for the dentist.

A perfect example of this is in the movie Cast Away where the main character has to knock out one of his own teeth.

Someone who knows how to clean and remove teeth could be a great help.

Fire Making will be a great skill to have as people won’t know how to start a fire once they’re lighters run out of fuel. People in your area will be safer and healthier if you can help them get a fire going so they can boil water and cook food.

First Aid/Medical skills will become vital as people tend to take doctors for granted. Without them, they will need help sewing up wounds, setting bones, performing CPR, and deciding which herbs and medications help with which ailments.

Food Storage. Canning, dehydrating, sealing, smoking skills will come into their own as people don’t know how to store food without a refrigerator.

Offer to preserve someone’s leftovers in exchange for help or supplies.

Gardening. Yet another skill that has become more and more rare. Learn to grow fresh herbs, fruits and vegetables, preferably indoors unless you have a secure backyard.

Gathering is great and the main thing here is knowing which naturally-occurring plants in your area have nutritional and/or medicinal value and which ones are useless and/or poisonous.

Gunsmithing will also be a vital skill If you’re facing a long-term disaster, people are going to need guns for hunting and self-protection.

It will help if you know how to repair guns and reload shells. But only help people you completely trust.

Hunting and Fishing. When food supplies get low and gardens fall short, people are going to have to hunt and fish.

If you can provide meat for your friends and family, they’ll have time to take care of other necessities.

Mechanic. Even if the Great Recession turns into Great Depression II, most people are still going to have jobs (remember, unemployment only got up to 25% in the 1930′s), which means they’ll need a way to get to work.

The problem for many people is that they won’t be able to afford to get their cars fixed.

If you learn how to work on cars, or any machine for that matter (lawnmowers, generators, etc.), you’ll have a particularly valuable skill.

Plumbing. People will still need their sinks and toilets, even more so if they’re washing clothes in the sink.

Learn to remove clogs, fix toilets and replace leaky pipes.

Psychology. A lot of people will crack up under the stress of seeing their entire world turned upside down, especially those who lose friends and/or loved ones.

It is important to know how to help these people and keep them from wallowing in despair.

Security. In a world full of criminals and looters, someone is going to need to stand guard when others are busy or sleeping.

This person will need to know how to use weapons and be practiced in hand-to-hand combat.

Soap/Candle Making. If the disaster goes on for long, soap and candles will be in high demand and a valuable trade item.

Teacher.

Even if the schools are closed, it’s still important that children spend part of their spare time reading and learning.

Remember, these are the children that will grow up and rebuild the world.

Water Purification. One of the most important skills of all! In the weeks after a major catastrophe, many people will die from dehydration or from drinking unsafe water.

It will help a lot if you learn all you can about cleaning and filtering water.

There are several other skills I thought about including in this list such as bee keeping, brewing, and electrical work, but I think the 20 listed above will probably be the most in-demand skills.

Crossing Rivers

The beauty of a mountain stream flowing through a forest can be the highlight of the day. But knowing how to cross a river is a critical Survival skill.

The fact is that crossing rivers, especially when they’re running high, is among the riskier things you can do on the trail. Rocks and logs may offer a bridge to the opposite bank.

But they’re often wet or covered with algae and mosses.

That can lead to slips and falls, and, therefore, any number of things that you really don’t want to experience: head injuries, broken bones, and the chance to get swept downstream.

The rate of runoff in streams and rivers is highly variable. In years of light snowfall and hot spring days, streams may run at low-to-moderate levels by early summer.

However, in years with heavy and late-season snows, rivers can run so high that trails, even ones with actual bridges can remain impassable well into summer.

Two keys to remember:” Don’t take any unnecessary risks. And don’t push anyone past their skill and confidence level. You’re only as capable as the weakest person in your group”

Check on conditions. Identify your destination or trail.
Then check for updates on weather conditions.

Carry a Staff or a pole. They can help you assess water depth and rate of runoff, then provide additional stability when you do cross a stream.

Wear shorts or convertible pants. Long pants will increase drag in the stream and can be uncomfortable to hike in once they’re soaked.

Pack hiking sandals or gym shoes. If a stream is shallow enough to cross, it’s often easier to walk through the water instead of trying to boulder hop on slippery rocks. With spare shoes or hiking sandals, you can keep your hiking boots dry.

But don’t cross barefoot or use flip-flops because the current can easily sweep them off your feet.

Get out early. Cooler overnight and morning temperatures mean that the volume of snowmelt is lower early in the day, which means that streams will flow more slowly.

Thunderstorms are also more common in afternoon and make currents more treacherous.

At the Crossing assess the situation. The actual point where a trail meets a river may not be the best place to get to the other side.

Scout the river (ideally from an elevated perspective) or look both up- and downstream for alternatives. If you can’t identify a safe crossing location, then don’t take the risk and turn around.

Wishful thinking has no place in this decision, so be conservative and assume the worst. Invariably, streams are faster and deeper than they appear.

Straight, Wide, Shallow. That’s what you’re looking for when identifying a place to cross.

Watch out for debris. If the river is carrying a lot of debris, such as branches and small logs, it’s not a good idea to cross.

The debris is an indication that stream flows are high. And objects flowing downstream can create a serious hazard if they strike you as you’re crossing.

Look for braided channels. The crossing may be wider where a river breaks into separate channels. But the current’s intensity will be dissipated and there may also be small islands or gravel bars where you can take a break and plot your next steps.

Test the current.

Toss a branch and watch how swiftly it moves downstream.
That will give you a better sense of the direction of the main current and how
fast it’s moving.

Don’t cross where flows are much above your knees. Even comparatively shallow water can knock you off balance and carry you downstream if it’s flowing rapidly enough. The only time to wade through deeper water is when you locate a flat pool with little or no current.

Loosen your pack before crossing. Undo your waist belt and let out the shoulder straps so that it’s easier to remove. If you fall in and your pack gets soaked, it can drag you down or get snagged. You might lose your pack but consider the alternative.

Look for low and open exit points on the opposite bank. Once you reach the other side, you’ll want to be able to get out of the stream as quickly as possible. A scramble up a steep bank could lead to a slip that puts you right back into the stream.

When crossing the Stream face Upstream and Shuffle Sideways.
Slide your feet along the bottom while facing the river.

Angle yourself diagonally to the flow and move in a slightly downstream direction toward the opposite bank.

Always maintain two points of contact with the bottom. Use your staff or pole to steady yourself as you shift your feet. The more contact you have with the bottom, the more stable you’ll be.

There’s strength in numbers. Crossing with a partner or with a group of people creates additional stability. Link arms and coordinate your movements.

The Deadly Enemies to Your Survival

When putting together survival kits, there are 8 enemies of survival to consider – no matter whether the kit is for someone going into the bush, or if the kit is being made for a teotwawki situation. Taking care of these eight issues by stocking up your kit will go a long way to ensuring your survival in just about any survival situation.

Fear:

Fear often leads to panic and panic does no one any good…in fact it often kills. The best way to temper fear is by preparing with proper survival skills and survival gear.

Survival skills help reduce fear because you know that you can take care of yourself in a survival situation. Without those survival skills people who are lost are often so scared they don’t know what to do. They’re scared of the animals, scared of the dark, scared of being without all of the comforts of civilization.

Survival gear helps combat fear because it gives you the tools that makes surviving easier.

Complacency:

Complacency is a bane of modern life. Complacency is dangerous because it lulls you into believing everything is alright and causes you to ignore clear signs of danger. A good way to combat complacency is by practicing the art of relaxed awareness.

Relaxed awareness is similar to the art of meditation….it is achieved by being fully immersed and aware of your surroundings. A good example of relaxed awareness is when you are practicing defensive driving.

After you practice defensive driving, you remember the entire drive because your mind was fully engaged and active the entire trip. Unfortunately relaxed awareness isn’t something you can pack in a bag, but you can practice it constantly to help ensure your survival.

Hunger:

Hunger can nag at you, slow you down, and eventually kill you. Combat hunger by learning primitive hunting and fishing skills. Make sure that you have snare wire, survival knives, paracord, a fishing kit and anything else you can think of that will help you find and secure game and fish. Also, learn what wild plant in the area are edible.

Thirst

You will die in only a few days without water. Depending on your activity level and the environment, you will need at least a gallon of water a day. Knowing how to locate, store and decontaminate water is essential. Always carry a way to store and decontaminate water.

98.6 degrees Fahrenheit

If you can’t keep the core temperature of your body at 98.6 degrees, you are in a world of hurt. Cody Lundin of “Dual Survival” fame covers this reality very well in his book “98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive“.

You need to be able to protect your body from both heat and the cold. Always have a way to make a quick emergency shelter in your survival kit. Bivy bags are lightweight and take up very little room. You also need several ways to start a fire in your kit. Also, always have clothing in your survival kit that is rugged and made for the weather of the season that you are in.

Pain

Avoid pain at all costs. It can cripple or at the very least slow you down to the point that you are in imminent danger of losing your life. If possible, carry medications to deal with it. Injuries are more likely when one panics or is fatigued.

Fatigue

Getting overly tired or fatigued makes the chances of injury greater and increases the dangers of exposure. One important thing to understand is that fatigue affects your mind just as much as it does your body.

Arctic explorers discovered that if you sleep when you need to rather than pushing on, you will wake up when you become cold. If you push on till you collapse from exhaustion you’ll freeze to death instead of waking up.

Boredom

Boredom is like a cancer that slowly eats away at morale. It is always a good idea to keep a way to entertain you in your survival kit. Something as simple as a deck of cards can do wonders for fighting boredom. To this one you can add loneliness…if you are alone. Loneliness can be devastating.

As you can see, these enemies of survival can all make surviving an emergency much more difficult…if not impossible. By understanding them you will have a much better chance of getting out of your next survival situation/emergency alive.

UK Self Defence Items

Being in some US states it must be nice to be able to carry a concealed firearm with you wherever you go to be able to protect yourself and your family from any of the millions of crazy pteople in the world who don’t have your best interest in mind.

Unfortunately, I live in the UK were it is illegal to carry any weapon.

Now that these religious terrorists are simply slashing and stabbing innocent people as they walk our streets or eat in local restaurants we NEED to think anout how we will defend ourselves should we be caught up in this type of attack.

Even if what you do carry is not a weapon and you use it to defend yourself it will then be classed as a weapon, by the cops how stupid is that?

Some governments have decided that it is up to only a chosen few to be able to do that and if you’re not lucky enough to be one of those chosen few, you need to hope that you happen to have one in the room if something happens – and hope they can take care of it on their own.

The chosen ones generally wear uniforms and I believe it to be a very dangerous thing if the only ones with the weapons are the police.

As they say, when seconds count, cops are just minutes away.

Luckily, there are many items that you can carry in public, and into pretty much any establishment. These items also don’t draw attention to yourself, in fact they are carried in open sight.

Newspaper/magazine

This is probably the most inconspicuous weapon of the all but with some training it can be extremely effective. It’s an improvised weapon that’s been taught to Special Forces and intelligence operatives for generations.

The key is rolling it up tight and holding it in the right spot. If you roll it toward the fold, you won’t have all the pages layered out alongside it so it’ll hold up better. You can also pre-roll it and keep it tight with rubber bands too, which would make it very effective, but now you’re starting to lose the inconspicuousness of it.

Torch/Flashlight

I like the Elzetta ZFL-M60 Tactical Weapon-Grade LED Torch which has a strike bezel in the front that would allow you to dig into an opponent while striking them.

I think that would definitely stop someone if you got hit by it. The problem is, that will also draw attention to you and some places don’t allow them because they consider them weapons – and rightly so; there is no other use for that tip than as a weapon.

The truth is, however, you don’t need that tip. Any torch of the right size can be used just as effectively without it. Just as with the newspaper, it’s all about where you strike.

Some of them have a mode where you can ‘disorient’ an attacker with a strobe light and a good torch has a setting were you can chose strobe or beam from the off.

The best ones to get will be ones that will extend out both ends of your hand while holding it so you can strike from either direction, but will also fit in your pocket and can be easily pulled out when you need it.

Walking Stick/umbrella

A walking stick or umbrella is probably the most effective weapon on this list. It can give you more reach, can hit harder, and can give you more leverage than anything else I have mentioned.

Most umbrellas are terrible weapons. They break easily and have a tendency to pop open if you shuffle them around too much. There are exceptions though. The U-115 is just one example of an umbrella that you can use to defend yourself effectively but won’t be typically seen as any kind of a weapon.

It’s built very tough and is discreet. The problem with umbrellas though is if it’s not raining or about to rain, you look a little suspicious carrying it around.

However a sturdy walking stick can be used as a weapon extremely well. You just have to pick one that doesn’t look like a weapon. The key here is to find one that won’t break easily and has a heavy handle on the end.

You can get hardwood walking sticks with brass handles fairly inexpensively. Contrary to what you may think; the fancier something like this looks, the less likely it is that it would be confiscated.

Nicer things aren’t seen as often as being intended for nefarious purposes. Don’t go for something that has a skull or dragon on it.

Belt

You don’t need to have a hidden knife to use a belt effectively. You do need to find a belt and a pair of pants that will allow you to pull it off quickly without your pants dropping to your ankles in a fight.

A wide leather belt with a heavy buckle works well. Just watch that the loop near the buckle doesn’t catch on the front loop of your pants, causing it to not want to come out.

Pen

I personally carry a tactical/survival pen a lot of times because it’s now part of my personal EDC kit. These are really useful to have but more likely to be seen as a potential threat than a normal pen will.

The fact is though, just about any pen can be used as a weapon. All you need is to have an inch or so sticking out of your fist as you hold it, and then use it to poke holes in the fleshy parts of your attacker.

UK Legal Spray

In conjunction with the items I have mentioned I also always carry a UK legal spray, mine is made by Mace in the US and is readily available in the UK at http://stoppared.com/ it gives you the option of flight or fight.

I would rather be judged by twelve than carried by six.

 

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