This Week’s Show 31st May 2018

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SHOW NOTES Starting this week with Emergency Food in the Boot, then The Wilderness Gathering, Blizzard Survival 20% Discount Offer, Boiled British Freshwater Fish Recipes, How to Make Nettle Soup, Considerations for Your Bug Out Location, The Pheasant Casserole and Partridge Curry MRE Review, Backpack Survival.

I’m back, and I have missed you all very much indeed, this station was the first in the UK, and thanks to you it is the best in the UK. My health has for many years been the one thing that has prevented me from doing my show.

I want to thank you all for standing by me, it means a great deal to me.

Tommy Robinson

Breaking News – Following a successful legal challenge, I can now fully report on the outrage of this arrest and sentence of 13 months!

Stalins Russia, Hitlers Germany, modern day China or N. Korea, these are the descriptions of the UK today.

Patriots across the world are in shock over the arrest of counter-jihad activist Tommy Robinson. Even worse, the British state has imposed sweeping reporting restrictions to stop people finding out what has happened.

All over the free world the ‘elites’ are imposing a Soviet-style clampdown and Tommy is just the latest victim of their hatred and fear of the truth. Paul Golding and Jayda Fransen of Britain First have also been recently thrown in jail. Others, like Lauren Southern and Jim Dowson, have been deported and harassed by authorities.

The West, the home of free speech and the birthplace of the very concept of liberty, is now as repressive as any old Communist regime. It doesn’t matter what group you are with or exactly which aspect of the new liberal totalitarianism you oppose, if you’re a patriot they are coming for you!

It’s getting worse literally by the day. Thousands of patriots are being gagged on Twitter and Facebook, or kicked off altogether. And this is happening in the USA too; the same far-left hatred of the truth is on the loose in the Land of the Free.

The liberties for which millions have fought and died have been trampled into the mud in Britain, and freedom is hanging by a thread in America too.

So this latest attack on Tommy Robinson, on is an attack on all of us; on you. Who will stand up if or WHEN they come for YOU?

Blizzard Survival 20% Discount Offer

Blizzard Survival .com have a fantastic offer for you the listener they are offering a 20% discount on all goods bought from them at www.blizzardsurvival.com

The Ultimate in Lightweight Thermal Protection.

The Blizzard Survival Brand incorporating Reflexcell™ material has become the new standard wherever thermal performance in a lightweight compact package is essential – for military use, casualty care, emergency preparedness, disaster relief, personal survival, outdoor activities…and more.

Reflexcell™ products are totally unique: weight-for-weight far warmer than goose down, yet 100% weatherproof, tough, ultra-portable and re-usable.

Life-saving technology has never been so affordable.

All you have to do to get a 20% discount is enter the code “PREPPER” at the checkout, it is that simple. Thank you Blizzard Survival.com

Emergency Food in the Boot

In the boot of my car is my 72hr BOB and I have for for some time been thinking of expanding that for say a week and certainly in the case of food.

So I have bought a 40ltr plastic box with a lid and I have filled it with ten year shelf life German tinned sausages already cooked and in tins, five year Bread, some high energy bars, home made trail mixes, ziplock bags of pre mixed Bannock mix, boiled sweets, chewing gum, all day breakfast tins, curries and stews, tea, coffee dried milk, Bovril drinks, and a tin opener. I think that is all.

With water purification covered in my BoB with three different types of tablets, the Putitab, Biox Aqua tabs and a liquid treatment called Purinize and the Water-to-go bottle I know over kill, but the tabs are very light and as it is an addition to my BOB and it is mine I will have what I want in it. You have that choice too.

I think that the car is one of the most important places to store emergency preparedness supplies because you usually are located in the same place as your car.

And, in the event that you are away from home when a disaster strikes, the roads may become unsafe or impossible to drive.

You may be forced to travel great distances and endure extreme weather conditions as you walk to a safe location or to meet up with loved ones.

Keeping emergency supplies in your car can also be a life-saver in the event you have a roadside emergency and become stranded in a remote location.

Emergency Food

Just keeping preserved food in your car is not enough because most shop bought food will not store safely in a car for more than a few months. My food will store safely in my car for a minimum of 5 year, in fact it is actually rated at 10 years.

However what ever food you decide upon even shop bought is not a problem if you rotate it which I recommend you do.

Emergency Water You should also keep a minimum of 3 days of emergency drinking water in your car emergency kit.

However, storing bottled water is not the smartest or cheapest way to store emergency water in your car. Because of the extreme temperatures that occur inside your vehicle, bottled water will store safely for less than 6 months.

My water pouches are US Coast Guard Approved, 5-year shelf-life, 3-day supply of emergency water rations.

Since water remains the most important survival item to have, you can see why I have tablets and filters which can be used to purify extra water for drinking without having to carry it in your kit if you have to walk to a safe location.

Emergency Shelter Supplies

If you get stuck in your car or have to travel by foot in the cold, you will need proper emergency shelter supplies. That is why you need emergency shelter supplies in your car boot.

I carry proper shelter supplies including emergency survival blankets, ponchos to protect yfrom the weather, and a tube tent for easy emergency shelter from the elements. I also have resuable heat pads, a tarp and duct tape just in case I have to cover up a broken window for example.

Emergency Lighting

If you have to get out of your car and walk to a safe location during or after a disaster, you may be stuck walking at night and the street lights may also be out.

People usually know that it is very important to keep emergency torches/flashlights in their car but often people forget that they also have to replace the batteries every 6 months.

I also have some 12 hour emergency lightsticks and a wind up torch. Don’t forget batteries…save yourself money and buy LED as they use much less power.

Emergency First-Aid Kits

Firstly every driver should have one now, never mind in an emergency. In a major disaster while people are at work, many may become injured as they evacuate the building due to dangerous debris.

That is why businesses need to keep comprehensive emergency first aid kit, and why you should have one in your vehicle too.

Emergency Radios

If you need to travel by foot to a safe location after a disaster, you will need to know where to go. In order to avoid walking into a potentially more dangerous situation, you should keep an emergency radio in your car.

I have a solar powered/wind up radio as well as a CB radio this radio is highly recommended because ordinary battery operated emergency radios have many limitations such as the facts that batteries only last for hours and have an extremely limited shelf-life of around 6 months.

Emergency Tools

If you find yourself stranded on the the road without any tools you are in a dangerous situation. When broken down on the side of the road, you put you and your passengers at risk of getting hit by oncoming traffic and passing strangers.

Getting stranded can also be deadly due to extreme hot and cold weather conditions; especially following a disaster when emergency assistance may not be available. That is why you need to be self-reliant and keep a roadside emergency kit in your car.

The Wilderness Gathering

If you’ve never been to the Gathering before and you love nature and the outdoors, then this is the family show for you – Wilderness Gathering, a unique Bushcraft event, is the longest running and still the original festival of bushcraft, survival and primitive living skills.

The Gathering has become a social event and brings together families and friends, all those interested in Bushcraft and Wilderness living skills to enjoy a weekend of knowledge sharing in a relaxed and family friendly atmosphere

Live Music

Not only is the Gathering the place you to come to – to learn new skills, brush up on your old ones and meet some of the best bushcraft experts in the country but it has also become, over the past fifteen years, the place you come to – to gather and socialise round the campfire with friends, old and new.

Children’s Bushcraft

The Coyote Clubs were introduced in 2005 and host a comprehensive range of events and activities specifically tailored for children from 5 to 15 year old.

The Masterclass

The Masterclasses were introduced in 2005 and are your opportunity to study your favourite Bushcraft subject in depth with a leading Bushcraft instructors.

Where is it?

Located on a South Wiltshire farm with lakes and 30 acres of old oak woodlands. You get access to woodlands and fields to erect whatever shelter you want.

Add to this great food, local cider, mead, evening entertainment. great people and it’s now over 5 days it has to time to get booked http://www.wildernessgathering.co.uk/tickets.htm.

Blizzard Survival 20% Discount Offer

Blizzard Survival .com have a fantastic offer for you the listener they are offering a 20% discount on all goods bought from them at www.blizzardsurvival.com

The Ultimate in Lightweight Thermal Protection.

The Blizzard Survival Brand incorporating Reflexcell™ material has become the new standard wherever thermal performance in a lightweight compact package is essential – for military use, casualty care, emergency preparedness, disaster relief, personal survival, outdoor activities…and more.

Reflexcell™ products are totally unique: weight-for-weight far warmer than goose down, yet 100% weatherproof, tough, ultra-portable and re-usable.

Life-saving technology has never been so affordable.

All you have to do to get a 20% discount is enter the code “PREPPER” at the checkout, it is that simple. Thank you Blizzard Survival.coml 20% Discount Offer

Blizzard Survival .com have a fantastic offer for you the listener they are offering a 20% discount on all goods bought from them at www.blizzardsurvival.com

The Ultimate in Lightweight Thermal Protection.

The Blizzard Survival Brand incorporating Reflexcell™ material has become the new standard wherever thermal performance in a lightweight compact package is essential – for military use, casualty care, emergency preparedness, disaster relief, personal survival, outdoor activities…and more.

Reflexcell™ products are totally unique: weight-for-weight far warmer than goose down, yet 100% weatherproof, tough, ultra-portable and re-usable.

Life-saving technology has never been so affordable.

All you have to do to get a 20% discount is enter the code “PREPPER” at the checkout, it is that simple. Th www.BlizzardSurvival.com

Boiled British Freshwater Fish Recipes

Why should camp fire cooking be only grill bake and roast?

Why should camp fire cooking be bland?

Why not plan and prepare for your wild food meals?

These can be cooked using foraged greens or taken home and given the chief treatment.

Boiled Tench

Prepare the tench by scaling, gutting, removing the gills then washing and patting dry.

Place in a large pan then pour over just enough water to cover. Add 25g of salt per 1l of water added then bring to a simmer, cover and cook gently for about 10 minutes, or until the fish is cooked through.

Transfer the tench to a warmed serving plate and garnish with parsley. Accompany with melted butter.

Boiled Trout

This is a traditional British recipe for a classic dish of boiled trout that’s filleted and served topped with a truffle, garlic, vinegar, lemon juice and olive oil. Ingredients: 2 medium trout, cleaned and scaled 2 summer truffles 2 garlic cloves 1 tbs. red wine vinegar 2 tsp extra-virgin olive oil juice of 1 lemon sea salt, to taste

Method

Bring a pan of lightly-salted water to a boil. Add the trout and cook for about 20 minutes, or until done through. Remove the fish then take off all the skin and fins.

Take the fish and carefully remove the flesh as four fillets (discard all the bones). Arrange these fillets on a serving plate.

In the meantime, place the truffles and garlic in a mortar and crush to a paste.

Add the vinegar and lemon juice and mix thoroughly to combine. Place the oil in a pan, add the truffle mixture and heat gently over a low flame (this should be just heated through, do not allow the sauce to fry).

Take off the heat and season to taste. Pour the sauce over the fish and serve.

Feed the 5 thousand

A fish boil is a fun, low-maintenance way to feed a large group of people — and although it is traditionally served outdoors, you can also bring the party inside.

Whether you’re planning an outdoor picnic or a big family get-together, a fish boil provides a nutritious, low-calorie meal for the entire family.

Step 1

Fill a large pot about three-quarters of the way up with water. Bring the water to a boil, either on your stovetop or outside on an open fire.

Step 2

Add the potatoes and 1 pound of salt for every 10 people, and then bring the liquid back up to a boil. Cook for 8 minutes, then add the onions to the pot.

Step 3

Add 2 pounds of peeled baby carrots, if desired. Wait until the water comes back to a boil, and then cook another 2 minutes. Double these cooking times for every 10 people you are serving.

Step 4

Add the whitefish and cook for 14 minutes. Use an instant-read thermometer to test the centre of the fish. If the fish reaches 145 degrees Fahrenheit in the centre, it’s done.

Step 5

Place one piece of fish, three onions and two potatoes on each plate, then add a pat of butter and spoon some of the broth over the fish. Serve with a wedge of lemon.

How to Make Nettle Soup

With consumers being so bombarded with marketing for ready-meals, fast-food, and other chemical rubbish often I find people forget about some of nature’s ingredients that are normally right on their doorstep!

This recipe will go through how to make a nettle soup, which not only is a cheap and easy to make meal but also extremely good for you.

Nettles (which are rich in iron and contain lots of great vitamins) have been said by many to have anti-anaemic, anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties.

It’s also a diuretic so is great for detoxing and helps remove toxins from the blood.

On top of all that it also is a great remedy against arthritis, rheumatic conditions, allergies, kidney disease…. (And the list goes on!)

All of that from a pesky weed that most of us avoid and ignore!

Preparation:

First things first, pick a good spot. I would try avoid any spots that are nearby to roads as you’ll likely get a mouthful of pollution, and try to look out for the smaller sized nettles as they are more nutritious and tasty for your soup.

The spot I found today was in a clearing in a local wood but the same principles can be applied to most of the world!

Now you have found your spot, onto some practicalities of nettle picking, wear a good pair of gloves.

If you get stung, take a look around for any doc leaves (big vainly leaves normally found nearby to nettles) as rubbing these on a new sting will relieve the pain.

Typically to make a batch of soup for four people you will want to get about half a bag of nettles.

At this point if you want to pick more nettles you might want to consider filing up your bags and then:

Preparing and freezing any leftover nettles for another day (just wash/cut/dry them and they will freeze well)

Making nettle tea by cutting off the tips (they taste less bitter in tea) and putting in a cafetiere.

You can also dry the nettles for tea by either hanging them up in a warm place (the airing cupboard.

Look up some of the other handy uses for nettles (you’ll probably be surprised how versatile they are!)

Ingredients:

1 large onion

2 or 3 garlic gloves (or more or less to your taste)

2 or 3 potatoes

Splash of olive oil

Knob of butter

Organic salt and organic pepper (to taste)

Chicken stock (this is very easy to make from leftover chicken) or just use a cube

Cream (optional, to taste)

Cayene Pepper or Chilli Flakes (optional if you like your soups to pack a kick!)

Making the Soup:

Step 1 Prepare the nettles (again at this point you may want to wear some gloves to avoid getting stung).

Wash and drain the nettles.

You only want to use the fresh smaller young looking leaves so pick these off the stalk and discard the rest (or better still stick them on your compost pile!). I find using a pair of scissors is a fast way of doing this.

Preparing the nettles for the soup

Step 2 Peel and chop your potatoes, garlic, and onion and fry them on a high heat in a saucepan with a bit of olive oil and some butter until the onion is soft and the potatoes have started to go brown.

If you want a spicy “sting!” to your soup then also add in either some cayenne pepper or some chilli flakes to taste.

Making the nettle soup mix

Step 3 Add the nettles into the pan and mix around with a wooden spoon and after 30 seconds or so add a litre of boiled water and your chicken stock. (If you have made the stock fresh you may need a few extra cubes to get in more flavour)

Step 4 Boil the soup on a medium heat until the potatoes are soft (normally takes between 12-15 minutes).

Step 5 Take the soup off the heat (and ideally let it cool for a bit) then blend the whole thing till you have a smooth consistency.

You can return the soup to the pan on a high heat after this briefly to warm it up ready for serving adding in any salt and pepper to taste.

Step 6 Serve the soup with some nice organic bread and if you like you can add some cream by swirling around in the bowl with a small spoon for a mind blowing and decorative finish!

Considerations for Your Bug Out Location

If worse came to worse and the world was in chaos, where would you go?

Many people already have determined where they would go – a bug out location – a spot where they could lay low and live for a while if things got pretty bad.

If you haven’t decided where you’d go during an emergency, or you already have an idea, here are a few points to consider.

How far away?

How far away is your bug out location going to be from your home?

With some disasters it doesn’t need to be very far away.

For example, a flood zone might only take up a few miles and you might be able to walk to your bug out location.

Other disasters, like an economic disaster or nuclear one, might require you to get a little further away from your home.

What kind of shelter?

Once you get to your bug out location, what kind of shelter are you going to live in?

Is there a house on the property?

Are you going to be staying in a tent?

The type of shelter that you have might affect how long you are able to stay in the location.

If you have to go to your bug out location in the dead of winter, you might be moving if your only have a tent.

Many people even considering purchasing land in a more remote location so they don’t have to worry about living on someone else’s property.

This would allow you to build a home and place supplies there.

Bug out location example

Do you have an emergency bag?

I’ve talked previously about what kind of items you’d want in an emergency bug out bag or 72-hour kit.

Depending on what are you’re in, your emergency items might differ.

For example, if your bug out location is right next to a river, you might want a water filter instead of large water containers.

Water

Speaking of water, it’s important to know where you will have access to water during an emergency.

If man-made water sources aren’t working, you might need to choose a location that has it’s own natural water source.

You might want to choose a location close to a lake, river, stream or natural well. Mind you, if man-made water systems are out of service, a lot of people are going to be looking for water in these locations.

You’ll also need to consider how susceptible those sources are to contamination.

Nearby food

Depending on how long you plan on staying at your bug out location, food might be a major consideration.

Are you going to have enough animal or plant life around you that you can just live off the land?

Are you going to be packing in all your food? Is the ground suitable for planting?

Popular for other people

If you think you’ve found the perfect place for you, there might be others that think the same.

While at times, preparing to defend yourself is necessary, you might have a leg up if you know how to barter and maintain a good relationship with other people who are also bugging out in the same location.

How are you going to get there?

As I say, this really depends on how far away your location is from your home. If it’s close to your home, you might consider walking or riding a bike.

If it’s far away, are you going to be driving? This also has an impact on your ability to prepare with food and water.

If you are going to be packing in a lot of water and food, how far you have to travel might be a big decision.

How many people are you planning for?

Is it just going to be you? Your spouse? Your children? Friends? Extended family?

Many times, people will join with a family friend to buy property and build a home on their bug out location. This is probably one of the first things you’ll need to determine because it has a huge effect on your food storage, water storage and other emergency supplies.

Communication

How are you going to get in contact with others?

Going to bug out location doesn’t necessarily mean that you won’t need to communicate.

Are you going to be too far away that you don’t get cell phone coverage? Are you going to get radio and/or TV coverage?

Staying in contact with people will help you know what is going on and help you stay prepared.

Medical Care

Are you going to have the right supplies at your bug out location? While you might have enough food and water, what if you have a large cut and can’t heal yourself?

You might consider a bug out location that is close enough to civilization that you can go to a hospital or find the right drugs that you need but is also far enough away that you can escape if you need to.

So what else?

What do you think? What other considerations did you take into account when you were determining your bug out location?

BREAK

The Pheasant Casserole and Partridge Curry MRS Review

The Coury Food Trust and What They Do

In simple terms, they are a charity food producer making top quality protein based food which they donate to charities who feed people in need. The charity is funded by individual donors, corporate supporters and charitable organisations.

They started by speaking to charities that told them they get a lot of nutritionally low value food – but very little meat and they had little chilling or freezer capacity. They knew there were affordable, plentiful and nutritional meat sources available which they could turn into meals and they worked with charities on the product design.

Currently they have two products, The Country Casserole, a nutritious and warming pheasant casserole and The Country Curry, a mildly spicy partridge curry.

In 2016 they produced 20,408 meals and in 2017 they produced 100,000 meals. These meals are donated to those in food poverty either directly to people in need, charities who feed people in need or through amazing charities like FareShare who distribute food nationwide to other charities.

They wanted to increase thier financial sustainability, so, they sell our meals on the basis that for every meal purchased another will be distributed to someone in poverty. The charity is not for profit so all money raised from selling our produce goes back to feeding more people in need. Currently they sell to supporters, online and are looking at farm shops. They also sell or aim to sell at events such as Fairs, Country Shows and Music events.

The Partridge Curry was very tasty indeed if not a little hot/spicy, but warming and filling when eaten with rice.

The Pheasant Casserole did not disappoint either, I love it very tasty and filling when eaten with mash.

These meals are not only worth in they are as MRE’s are supposed to be filling, easy to store (room temp) easy to heat and for everyone you buy you know that the Country Food trust will donate a Partridge Curry or Pheasant Casserole to a person in poverty, what a great idea.

The Pheasant Casserole and the Partridge Curry from The Country Food Trust http://www.thecountryfoodtrust.org/about/ (meat supplied by https://www.wildmeat.co.uk/)

BACKPACK SURVIVAL

There’s a lot of confusion about what survival means.

To some, it’s getting through the aftermath of an airplane wreck in a desolate area. It can mean knowing when to avoid walking in radioactive wastes.

Or, it can mean knowing how to barter with troops in the aftermath of riots, war, and looting. To others, survival has to do with avoiding danger and knowing how to deal with it when it breaks into your home in the dead of night.

Survival ideas abound and there are as many definitions and strategies as there are survivalists. Some have good ideas for survival and some have unsound tactics.

Bad ideas can mean extra work or trouble in everyday life; bad ideas during a survival situation get you killed.

On the job training doesn’t work when you’re dealing with poison and gunfights. Or survival.

One of the most dangerous ideas as far as I’m concerned is that of “backpack survival.”

A “backpack survivalist” is a survivalist that plans on leaving his home ahead of a disaster and taking to the woods with only what he can carry out with him.

He plans to survive through a strategy that is a sort of cross between the Boy Scout in the woods and Robinson Crusoe.

The backpack survivalist plans on outrunning danger with a four wheel drive or a motorcycle and hopes to travel light with a survival kit of everything he might need to cope with the unexpected.

He hasn’t cached anything in the area he’s headed for because, chances are, he doesn’t know where he’s headed.

Somehow, he hopes to overcome all odds with a minimum of supplies and a maximum of smarts.

Certainly it is a noble cause; but it seems like one destined to failure. And that’s not survival.

Hold on a minute. Backpack fever or bugoutosis does makes sense when you’re facing a localized disaster like a derailed train with overturned poisonous gas tanks.

A potential nuclear meltdown, an impending hurricane or severe flooding, or similar disasters where there is a safe place to run to.

During such a time, it makes perfect sense to retreat and come back when things settle down.

Likewise, some people have to work in dangerous areas.

For them, donning a backpack and heading for a retreat that they’ve prepared beforehand is a viable survival strategy.

These people aren’t backpack survivalists.)

Let me make a confession. Yes, I once was a closet backpack survivalist. I had an ALICE pack and had it packed with all I could carry.

As I learned more about how to survive, I realized I needed to carry more.

Soon I discovered that, just for my family to survive for a very few days, I’d need a pack mule and/or a hernia operation… Something was very wrong.

Probably most survivalists start out the same way. Things are bad so let’s bug out.

As backpack survivalists, we make elaborate plans centred on the idea of “bugging out” of the area we live in.

We hope to travel to an area that is safer than the one we’re in and plan on living off the land or on some survival supplies we’ve hidden in the area.

On the home front, we carefully prepare a stock of supplies that we can quickly cart off in a car or van when things start to look bad.

As more and more plans are made and as ever more survival gear is purchased, the survivalist realizes just how much he needs to cope with in order to survive.

If he is any sort of realist, he soon amasses enough gear to warrant a truck or more likely a moving van just for carrying the survival equipment.

(And don’t laugh, there are survivalists who have large trucks for just such use.)

Some brave souls continue to make more elaborate plans and some of these survivalists may be able to pull off their plans.

Those who have really thought things out and have spared no expenses may manage to survive with a bugout strategy.

But I think there are more logical and less expensive ways to survive a large crisis.

Forget all your preconceived notions for a minute.

Imagine that there is a national emergency and you are an outside observer?

What happens if a nuclear attack is eminent, an economic collapse has occurred, or a dictator has taken over and is ready to round up all malcontents (with survivalists at the top of the list)?

Situations change with time. The survivalist movement and backpack fever first started up when fuel guzzler cars were about all that anyone drove.

That meant that a survivalist with some spare fuel could outdistance his unprepared peers and get to a retreat that was far from the maddening crowd, as it were.

With cars getting 30 or even 40 miles per gallon, it isn’t rare for a car to be able to travel half way across the country on less than a full tank.

The exodus from cities or trouble spots will be more limited by traffic jams than lack of fuel even if the petrol stations are completely devoid of their liquid fuel too, there are a lot of people thinking about what to do if the time for fleeing comes.

And about half of the people I know are all headed for the same spot: an old Railway Tunnel void of water and food.

I suspect that the battle at the entrance of the old tunnel will rival the Little Big Horn.

No matter how out of the way their destination, most survivalists are kidding themselves if they think others won’t be headed for their hideaway spot along with them.

There are few places in the UK which aren’t accessible to anyone with a little driving skill and a good map.

There are few places which aren’t in grave danger during a nuclear war or national social unrest.

Though most nuclear war survival books can give you a nice little map showing likely targets, they don’t tell you some essential information. Like what the purpose of the attack will be.

The enemy may not be aiming for military targets that day; a blackmail threat might begin by hitting the heart of the farmland or a number of cities before demanding the surrender of the country being attacked.

The target areas on the maps might be quite safe.

And the maps show where the missiles land IF they all enjoy 100 percent accuracy and reliability.

Does anyone know of such conditions in war? With Soviet machinery!? Targets may be relatively safe places to be in.

Added to this is the fact that some areas can be heavily contaminated or completely free of contamination depending on the wind directions in the upper atmosphere.

Please keep a crystal ball in your survival gear?

But let’s ignore all the facts thus far for a few moments and assume that a backpack survivalist has found an ideal retreat and is planning to go there in the event of a national disaster… What next?

His first concern should be that he’ll have a hard time taking the supplies he needs with him.

A nuclear war might mean that it will be impossible to grow food for at least a year and foraging is out as well since animals and plants may be contaminated extensively.

An economic collapse wouldn’t be much better. It might discourage the raising of crops; no money, no sales except for the barter to keep a small farm family going.

With large corporations doing much of our farming these days, it is not unreasonable to expect a major famine coming on the heels of an economic collapse.

Growing food would be a good way to attract starving looters from miles around.

Ever try to pack a year’s supply of food for a family into a small van or car? There isn’t much room left over.

But the backpack survivalist needs more than just food.

If he lives in a cold climate (or thinks there might be something to the nuclear winter theory) then he’ll need some heavy clothing.

Rifles, medicine, ammunition, tools, and other supplies will also increase what he’ll need to be taking or which he’ll have to hide away at his retreat site.

Shelter? Building a place to live (in any style other than caveman) takes time.

If he builds a cabin beforehand, he may find it vandalized or occupied when he gets to his retreat; if he doesn’t build it before hand, he may have to live in his vehicle or a primitive shelter of some sort.

Thus, a major problem is to get a large enough vehicle to carry everything he needs as well as to live in.

There is a major problem of timing which the backpack survivalist must contend with.

He has to be packed and ready to go with all members of his family at the precise moment he learns of the disaster!

The warning he gets that warrants evacuating an area will have to be acted on quickly if he’s to get out ahead of the major traffic jams that will quickly develop.

A spouse at work or shopping or kids across town at school means he’ll either have to leave them behind or be trapped in the area he’s in.

A choice not worth having to make.

Unless he’s got a hot line from No 10, the backpack survivalist will not hear the bad news much ahead of everyone else.

If he doesn’t act immediately, he’ll be trapped out on the road and get a first-hand idea of what grid lock is like if he’s in an urban area.

Even out on the open road, far away from a city, a motorway can become hectic following a football game…

Imagine what it would be like if everyone were driving for their lives, some cars were running out of fuel (and the occupants trying to stop someone for a ride), and the traffic laws were being totally ignored while the traffic police tried to escape along with everyone else.

Just trying to get off or on major motorways might become impossible.

If things bog down, how long can the backpack survivalist keep those around from helping to unload his truck load of supplies that they’ll be in bad need of?

Telling them they should have prepared ahead of time won’t get many sympathetic words.

Even on lightly travelled roads, how safe would it be to drive around in a vehicle loaded with supplies?

Our backpack survivalist will need to defend himself.

But let’s suppose that he’s thought all this out. He has a large van, had the supplies loaded in it, managed to round every member of his family up beforehand, somehow got out of his area ahead of the mob, is armed to the teeth, and doesn’t need to take a motorway route.

When he reaches his destination, his troubles are far from over.

The gridlock and traffic jams won’t stop everyone. People will slowly be coming out of heavily populated areas and most of them will have few supplies.

They will have weapons (guns are one of the first things people grab in a crisis according to civil defence studies) and the evacuees will be desperate.

How many pitched battles will the survivalist’s family be able to endure? How much work or even sleep can he get when he’s constantly on the lookout to repel those who may be trying to get a share of his supplies?

This assumes that he gets to where he’s going ahead of everyone else. He might not though.

If he has to travel for long, he may discover squatters on his land or find that some local person has staked out his retreat area for their own.

There won’t be any law to help out; what happens next? Since (according to military strategists) our backpack survivalist needs about three times as many people to take an area as to defend it, he will need to have some numbers with him and expect to suffer some casualties.

Does that sound like a good way to survive?

What about the local people that don’t try to take over his retreat before he gets there?

Will they be glad to see another stranger move into the area to tax their limited supplies?

Or will they be setting up roadblocks to turn people like the backpack survivalist away?

But let’s just imagine that somehow he’s discovered a place that doesn’t have a local population and where those fleeing cities aren’t able to get to.

What happens when he gets to his retreat? How good does he need to be at hunting and fishing?

One reason mankind went into farming was that hunting and fishing don’t supply enough food for a very large population nor do they work during times of drought or climatic disruption.

What does he do when he runs out of ammunition or game?

What happens if the streams become so contaminated that he can’t safely eat what he catches?

Can he stake out a large enough area to guarantee that he won’t deplete it of game so that the next year is not barren of animals?

Farming? Unless he finds some unclaimed farm machinery and a handy storage tank of fuel at his retreat, he’ll hardly get off first base.

Even primitive crop production requires a plough and work animals (or a lot of manpower) to pull the blade.

No plough, no food for him or domestic animals.

And domestic animals don’t grow on trees. Again, unless he just happens to find some cows waiting for him at his retreat, he’ll be out of luck.

(No one has packaged freeze dried cows or chickens at least, not in a form you can reconstitute into living things).

Intensive gardening? Maybe. But even that takes a lot of special tools, seeds, know how, and good weather. Can he carry what he needs and have all the skills that can be developed only through experience?

Even if he did, he might not have any food to eat. Pestilence goes hand in hand with disasters.

Our modern age has forgotten this. But during a time when chemical factories aren’t churning out the insecticides and pest poisons we’ve come to rely on, our backpack survivalist should be prepared for waves of insects flooding into any garden he may create.

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